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Cambridge Behavioural Attributes

Cambridge Behavioural Attributes

CBA

Using the Cambridge Behavioural Attributes  

 

Behavioural attributes (or behavioural competencies) are a way of describing a range of individual characteristics that can be measured and used to identify and support expected behaviour at varying grades of experience and responsibility in the workplace. ‘Positive indicators’ are used to give examples of what may be expected.

The Behavioural Attributes Framework (BAF) is often used as a tool to support individual professional development and career progression. The behavioural attribute grid can be used to establish the level of each attribute which is suggested as being relevant to different grades. This can be found in the Career Development section of the Personal and Professional Development web pages. They are best used in discussion with your line manager as part of your regular Staff Review and Development cycle; however they can also be used at any time by an individual for their own development planning.

The Framework may also be used to support fair recruitment (including selection criteria, when short-listing and during interviews) and to support effective performance by clarifying standards and expectations of behaviour.

Note that the BAF has been designed as a flexible, generic tool to support all staff and the positive indicators are intended for use as a guide only. They are not exhaustive and not ALL indicators will be applicable to ALL roles within a grade. In most cases the positive indicators may be appropriate to a greater or lesser degree.

The Behavioural Attributes Framework is a guide to support individual professional development.  It has been designed as a flexible, generic tool to support all staff, therefore, it may sometimes be limited in its capacity to fully match the parameters of every role.  Therefore, it should be interpreted in discussion with your line manager as part of your regular Staff Review and Development discussion and in conjunction with the guidance on the HR website 

Here are some further thoughts for IT Professionals: 

  • The 80% ‘rule of thumb’ is a useful one. If you can evidence that you regularly demonstrate 80% of the indicators at a given level of an attribute, you are probably functioning effectively at that level. 

  • Don’t try and make them do a job they were not intended for. They were not designed to cover your technical skills, but rather the behaviours that will make you effective in the University. You are better off describing your technical skills using SFIA. 

  • Don’t underestimate their importance. Often our impact or success will depend on how well we combine our technical skills with the appropriate behavioural attributes. Invest time and effort in them as part of your development planning activity.